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20 Orange Flowers: Images & Care Tips

Orange flowers growing outside

Orange isn’t usually the first color you think of when shopping for flowers, but don’t overlook them – their warmth and exuberance liven up any space. In bouquets, orange flowers pair beautifully with their red, yellow, and pink counterparts. Orange and blue flowers make a striking combination. Plant orange flowers in the garden, and wait for the hummingbirds to visit – they love gardens with red and orange blooms! 

What do Orange Flowers Symbolize?

Orange flowers are connected with joy, enthusiasm, and even exhilaration. The color orange evokes energy, which in addition to the aforementioned, contributes to much of the symbolism attached to orange blooms, such as warmth and playfulness. Orange flowers symbolize encouragement and success, and are known for being workplace appropriate. They’re also symbols of friendship and good health, and success in all aspects of life.

The meanings connected with orange flowers makes them perfect for celebrating housewarmings, work promotions, and business openings. They bring messages of joy and good health to new families, and are a great choice for birthday bouquets. There are countless types of orange flowers, so it’s not hard to find just the right orange flowers to celebrate an occasion or add to your garden.

Orange Tulips

Orange tulips growing outside

Tulips are beloved by many gardeners, with several brilliant orange varieties in different sizes and several petals forms. Award winning orange Tulips include “Orange Ballerina,” “Orange Princess, ”“Orange Emperor,” and “Princess Irene.” Plant tulips in fall to enjoys vivid orange flowers in the spring.

  • USDA growing zones: 3 to 8
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: rich, medium moisture, well-drsined

Butterfly Weed

Close-up of butterfly weed growing outside

Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Asclepias_tuberosa_in_Farmington,_CT_4.jpg

Native to the eastern and southern United States, butterfly weed grows up to three feet tall, bearing clusters of small orange blooms that are extremely attractive to butterflies. Butterfly weed will spread, so if you want to contain it, be sure to remove the seed pods that appear once the flowers die.

  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 9
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: dry to medium moisture, well-drained

Orange Oriental Poppies

Close-up of orange oriental poppy

Oriental poppies punctuate the summer landscape with sultry red and orange blooms. The crepe paper-thin petals ruffle around dark centers, blooming atop clumps of grey-green foliage. Orange Oriental poppy varieties include: “Prince of Orange,” “Fireball,” “Eye Catcher,” and “Champaign Bubbles Orange.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 7
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: rich, medium moisture, well-drained

Calendula

Close-up of orange calendula flower

Also known as pot marigolds, calendula are popular garden annuals. They’re easy to grow from seed, producing bright chrysanthemum -like flowers. Start seeds indoors about seven weeks before the last frost, or outdoors right after the last frost. Removing wilted flowers will stimulate more blooming. 

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: average, medium moisture, well-drained

Montbretia

Orange montbretia flower growing outside

Frequently used in floral arrangements, montbretia is a remarkably hardy bulb that blooms in summer and will survive in the ground through cold winters. The blooms resemble freesia, with columnar clusters of orange or red tubular flowers that attract pollinators like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Orange varieties include “Prince of Orange,” “Orange Pekoe,” and “Lucifer.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 9
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: rich, medium moisture, well-drained

Canna Lily

Orange canna lily growing outside

Named for its resemblance to lilies, the canna isn’t a member of the lily genus. Flamboyant canna lilies bloom in the hot summer months, growing up to five feet tall and producing fiery tropical looking blooms. Canna lilies grow from rhizomes, which are underground stem systems which, unlike bulbs, can be cut in half to divide and replant. Orange calla lilies include “Cleopatra,” “South Pacific Orange,” “Orange Punch,” and “Lucifer.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 7 to 10
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: rich, moist, well-drained

Zinnia

Orange zinnia flower growing outside

Bright, cheery annuals, zinnias are popular with gardeners, blooming in a wide variety of colors. Zinnias are easy to plant from seed after the last frost, and adding seeds every few weeks will promote continuous blooming through midsummer. As with most annuals, removing spent flowers will result in more abundant blooms. Orange zinnia varieties include: “Orange King,” “Inca,” “Profusion Orange,” “Short Stuff Orange,” and “Benary’s Giant Orange.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: moist, humousy, well-drained

Trumpet Vine

Close-up of orange trumpet vine flowers

Trumpet vine is a vigorous climber, and a dramatic ornamental vine when given support from a fence or trellis. The vivid orange trumpet flowers will bring hummingbirds and other pollinators to your garden. Trumpet vine blooms in summer, and requires some pruning to contain its growth. Orange trumpet vine varieties include “Chicklet,” “Sky Island Orange,” and “Indian Summer.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 9
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: average, medium moisture, well-drained

New Guinea Impatiens

Close-up of orange impatiens flower

Popular and easy to grow, New Guinea Impatiens are recognizable for their large, flat, five petal flowers that come in many different colors. Although they’re annuals, it’s possible to overwinter them indoors near a sunny window. Orange varieties include: “Infinity Orange, ”“Divine Orange,” “Sonic Orange,” and “Sun Standing Flame Orange.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 12 as annuals 
  • Sun exposure: part shade
  • Soil needs: rich, moist, well-drained

Nasturtium

Orange nasturtium flowers growing outside

Nasturtium flowers are easy to grow from seed and not only add color to the garden, they’re edible, adding color and a delicate peppery flavor to salads and other dishes. Nasturtium flowers bloom into early fall, long after many flowers have faded. They prefer some shade and protection from harsh afternoon sun, but are otherwise adaptable and even somewhat drought resistant. The species form produces the purest orange flower, but other orange varieties include: “Outsidepride,” “Vesuvius,” and “Phoenix.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11 as annuals 
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: average, medium moisture, well-drained 

Mexican Sunflower

Close-up of orange Mexican sunflower

The annual Mexican sunflower grows to an impressive 4 to 6 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide. The large, vibrant orange blooms attract butterflies. They are striking as cut flowers in a bouquet or as an ornamental plant in the garden. Deadheading, or removing faded blooms, will promote flower production.

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11 as annuals
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: average, dry to medium moisture, well-drained

Crown Imperial

Close-up of orange imperial crown flowers

These unusual flowers bow their heads down, forming a crown shape that conceals the exquisite markings inside the flowers. Each small bell shaped flower in the “crown” has a pattern of white dots at the base of the petals. Crown Imperial flowers grow from bulbs, and will survive winter if protected with a layer of mulch during cold months. Orange varieties include: “Aurora,” “Bach,” “Rubra Maxima,” and “The Premiere.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 8
  • Sun exposure: full sun to partial shade
  • Soil needs: rich, medium moisture, well-drained

Daylily

Close-up of orange daylily flower

Daylilies are hardy and abundant growers, producing flashy blooms throughout summer. They tolerate most growing conditions, even thriving in harsh heat and humidity. To prevent overgrowth and keep daylilies healthy, the clumps should be divided and replanted. Most daylily varieties come in orange hues, from salmon to fiery red-orange. Some notable orange varieties are: “Bright Summer,” “Blaze of Glory,” “Centerton One,” Franz Hals,” Marse Connell,” “Mauna Loa,” “Ming Too,” and “Primal Scream.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 9
  • Sun exposure: part shade
  • Soil needs: average, medium moisture, well-drained

Begonia

Close-up of orange begonia flowers

Begonias are perennials, but are often grown as annuals because they are frost-tender. The flowers come in a variety of vibrant colors, including brilliant orange hues. Begonias need plenty of air circulation to prevent mildew and rot, especially in humid climates. Orange varieties include: “Orange Glow”, “Ruffled Apricot”, “Picotee Lace Apricot”, “Nonstop Fire”, and “Nonstop Orange”.

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11 as annuals
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: rich, moist, well-drained

California Poppy

Orange California poppy growing outside

True Californians, California poppies love the sun. Blooming in abundance from late spring to early summer, the flowers close up on cloudy days and at night. Deadheading will encourage additional blooming, but if you want continued growth you’ll want to leave a few spent blooms to spread seeds. California poppies come in shades of red, pink, and orange. Orange varieties include: “Thai Silk Apricot,” “Mikado,” “Native Orange,” and “Outsidepride.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 6 to 10
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: sandy, well-drained

Gerbera Daisy

Orange gerbera daisy growing outside

Showy gerbera daisy flowers are an eye-catching four inches across, with bare stems emphasizing their size. The plants are seasonal perennials, but are grown as annuals in colder zones. Orange varieties include “Garvinea Orangina,” “Volcanoes,” “Mega Revolution with Dark Eye,” and “Flori Line Maxi Orange.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 10 as annuals
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: rich, medium moisture, well-drained

Bird of Paradise

Close-up of bird of paradise flower

Unmistakable and striking, bird of paradise flowers are popular in flower arrangements. The bold, distinctive blooms resemble colorful birds in flight, mostly vibrant orange with periwinkle blue accents. Birds of paradise are tropical plants, but can be grown indoors near a sunny window.

  • USDA hardiness zones: 10 to 12
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: loamy, moist, well-drained

Dahlia

Close-up of orange dahlia flower

Dahlias are among the most stunning and diverse flowers groups, with varieties that range from low-growing plants to towering varieties with dramatic, giant flowers. Perennial in warmer zones, dahlias are often grown as annuals. They bloom in almost every color, with many brilliant orange cultivars including: “Chinese Lantern,” “Alfred Grille,” “Apache,” “Bora Bora,” “Caballera,” and “David Howard.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 11 as annuals
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: loamy, well-drained

Sneezeweed

Close-up of orange sneezeweed flowers

So named for its historic use to make snuff meant to cause sneezing, which was believed to rid the body of evil spirits, sneezeweed is a North American perennial. The flowers bloom profusely in late summer and early fall, and are attractive to butterflies. They are easy to grow and low maintenance, only needing to be cut back by half after the blooming season to keep the plants healthy. All sneezeweed varieties come in yellow to orange-red. Some true orange varieties include: “Potter’s Wheel,” “Biedermeir,” “Kokarde,” “Sahin’s Early Flowerer,” and “Moerheim Beauty.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 8
  • Sun exposure: full sun
  • Soil needs: rich, moist, well-drained

Rose

Orange rose growing outside

We couldn’t do a list of orange flowers without including the queen of flowers, the rose. This is a very diverse genus, with climbing roses and bushes, roses that bloom throughout the season and ones that just bloom once, and an endless variety of colors. Though they are rumored to be difficult, roses grow well in the garden with proper maintenance. Roses are known for their symbolism, and whether sending orange roses or another color, rose color meanings will help you choose the right rose for the occasion. There are many beautiful orange roses, including: “Mandarin Sunset,” “Rio Samba,” “Wildfire,” “Voodoo,” Outrageous,” and “Sierra Lady Sunbelt.”

  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 9
  • Sun exposure: full sun to part shade
  • Soil needs: loamy, medium moisture, well-drained 

Orange Flowers and More at Your Fingertips

The more you know about flowers, the better you can personalize your flower delivery experience. From color to symbolism to style, The Bouqs is here to help you choose the best way to celebrate with flowers. With spring around the corner, you might want to brush up on the best spring flowers. However you choose to design your bouquets, you can count on The Bouqs to deliver the freshest, longest lasting flowers from the farm to your door!

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