Sympathy Flowers

Express sympathy in a genuine manner with thoughtful funeral flower arrangements. A kind, tasteful gesture to let them know you care.

$12 Weekday Delivery

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Sending Sympathy with Flowers

Love first. Flowers second. Kindness always. These words are never more true than when you need to send gifts to somebody who has recently suffered the death of a loved one.

Experiencing loss is never an easy time for anyone, especially when things hit close to home. If you know someone who is in need of some comfort during these difficult times, sending along a batch of sympathy flowers can express your condolences. 

It isn’t always easy to say the right things, but our sympathy arrangements can help let the recipient know that you are keeping them in your thoughts and want to honor those who have passed. We want to make sure we can provide a bit of condolence for anyone who’s mourning. 


Sympathy Flower FAQs

Are flowers an appropriate sympathy gift?

Yes, flowers are a thoughtful sympathy gift. They are a beautiful choice to let somebody know that you're thinking of them during this difficult time of loss. There are no words that can take away a person's grief, so flowers are a tactful way to show a loved one that there are people here that care.


What's the difference between sympathy and funeral flowers?

Sympathy flowers are typically small bouquets sent to a grieving person's home or office. They show your loved one that they're in your thoughts. Funeral flowers are usually larger bouquets, wreaths, or sprays that are sent to the funeral home. These are displayed during the service to honor and remember the departed.


When should I send sympathy flowers?

You can send sympathy flowers any time, but we would suggest that the sooner you can offer your condolences, the better. That's why we offer same or next day delivery on some of our popular Bouqs. If you want to send something to the funeral home, schedule flower delivery for the day before the service.


Which flowers are most commonly used in sympathy flower arrangements?

Not every flower type is appropriate for every occasion. The bright colors of a "Get Well" Bouq may not suit the muted tone of a funeral, for example. In general, funeral flowers tend to be white or pale pink. More specifically, common funeral flower types include:

  • Lilies have long been popular sympathy flowers since they represent a return to innocence. White lilies, in particular, might be the most common type of flower funeral-goers will see.

  • Chrysanthemums are typical funeral flowers around the world. In Europe, chrysanthemums are so associated with death that they're rarely found in other arrangements, and Asian Pacific countries see white chrysanthemums as a symbol of grief and mourning.

  • Gladioli represent integrity and remembrance. They are often used as a funeral flower for people who were heavily involved in civic duties around their community such as judges, lawyers, and police officers.

  • Carnations are another frequent choice of sympathy flower gifts. White carnations symbolize innocence, while red carnations represent undying love and admiration.

  • Orchids are a lovely option for some women since they represent thoughtfulness and femininity. Pink orchids are the most common color choice for funerals.

  • Roses are the flower of true love, which makes them a natural choice for sympathy flowers. Since roses come in a variety of colors, you can select the color that best represents the deceased or your relationship to them.


What's an appropriate sympathy message to send with my flowers?

We know that it can be tricky figuring out what to write in a card accompanying a sympathy flower delivery. After all, no words exist to cure somebody's grief. Your goal is to express your support for the mourner.  A few phrases that we commonly see on sympathy cards include things like:

  • "My thoughts are with you and your family during this difficult time."

  • "I'm sorry for your loss."

  • "My deepest sympathies and sincere condolences as you mourn."

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