Care Instructions

Our best tips and tricks to prolong the life and freshness of your flowers and plants.

Care Instructions


Note: We highly recommend keeping all flowers and plants away from pets, as some may be poisonous. Please consult your veterinarian for questions about what is safe for your pet

Before you receive your bouquet or houseplant, it’s worth taking a moment to learn about how to care for this new addition. While many flowers and plants require similar care, some items will benefit from unique care practices. Fortunately, we’re going to cover the basics of how to care for popular cut flowers and potted plants.



General Bouquet Care:

While each flower is beautiful in its own right, many types of flowers benefit from similar care. Here are some bouquet care tips to keep in mind when you bring a Bouq into your home.

Unpack Your Bouquet ASAP

Your Bouq will arrive carefully packaged in a cardboard box that protected it during transit. However, When you receive your Bouq, you’ll want to bring it inside ASAP and remove it from its box within a few hours. After you’ve unboxed it, carefully unwrap the protective paper covering then undo the rubber band holding the stems together.

Give the Stems a Fresh Cut

During transit, the ends of the stems will have dried out. When this happens, the flowers may have a difficult time taking up water. But don’t worry — you just need to give the stems a trim! Use a sharp pair of pruning shears or scissors to give the end of each stem a fresh 45º cut. You’ll want to remove at least half an inch, but you can also remove more. Remove any leaves that fall below the water line to prevent bacteria.

Use Fresh Water and Flower Food

In case it’s not obvious, you’ll need to give your flowers water to drink! Make sure to use a clean vase to help prevent the spread of disease and fill the vase about halfway with water. Before you place your Bouq in the vase, add some of the flower food packet that comes included. This will help your flowers stay hydrated and prevent the buildup of bacteria. Remember to save save some of the flower food for when you change the water in the vase. It’s a good practice to change the water every two to three days. This will remove any bacteria that can cause your flowers to wilt prematurely. When you change the water, add some new flower food.

Keep Out of Direct Light and Away from Heat

It’s best to display your Bouq in a cool area out of direct sun. While many growing flowers will benefit from bright sunlight, this intense light can damage cut flowers. If possible, store your bouquet somewhere cool. However, if your home is on the warmer side, just make sure to keep the bouquet away from both hot and cold drafts. And if you’d really like to extend the life of your Bouq, pop it in the refrigerator at night then remove in the morning.

Stay Clear of Fruits

Before you place your Bouq right next to a fruit basket filled with apples and bananas, take a moment to learn a bit about ethylene. This gaseous plant hormone acts to speed up flowering and/or fruit ripening. While ethylene itself isn’t necessarily bad, exposing your bouquet to ethylene can cause your flowers to decline more quickly. Therefore, keep your flowers away from ethylene-producing fruits such as apples, bananas, mangos, peaches, and pears.

General Care Instructions for Plants

Just like when you receive a bouquet, you’ll want to bring your plant inside as soon as you can. Once it’s inside, unbox it and check to see if the soil is dry. If the top few inches are dry to the touch, go ahead and water. At this point, you can place your plant in a proper environment.

A Word About Shipping:

  • Plants currently CANNOT be shipped to Hawaii.

  • While we guarantee delivery by the date you select at checkout, plants could arrive up to two days earlier

Process Your Flowers

Flower Care 101

Styling Your Flowers

Icon TextLong Lifespan

Alstroemeria

Alstroemeria Care

Alstroemeria is delivered in bud form and may appear green and/or dark on arrival, but its colors will quickly become more vibrant as they bloom. Each stem contains multiple blooms, so a bunch of five stems often means 25 flowers! If you see an individual flower starting to fade, simply remove the unsightly bloom so the rest of the bouquet can shine.

*Multiple blooms per stems.

Water: Fill a vase with water and remove any submerged leaves

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Alstroemeria is shipped in bunches of 10, but with 5 blooms per bunch, we are really shipping 50 flowers per bunch!

Calla Lilies

Calla Lily Care

Surprise! These flowers aren’t lilies at all. Despite this confusion, they’re still gorgeous.

When it comes time to care for calla lilies, take note of these flowers’ unique features. While many flowers have woody or thick stems, calla lilies sport soft and pliable stems. Therefore they’re extra susceptible to rot. To keep your calla lilies happy, place only the bottom two inches of the stems in water. And since these are thirsty flowers, check the water daily and refill as necessary..

Water: Ensure only the bottom two inches of stems are in water

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Icon TextLong Lifespan

Carnations

Carnation Care

Carnations last longer than almost any cut flower. With proper care, they can last up to three weeks and will average around 14 days. Make sure to cut the leaves that fall below the water line. This is important to maximize your carnation’s vase life. Change they water in the vase about every three days or when the vase water looks cloudy. After a week, recut the stems at a 45-degree angle a few inches above the initial 45-degree cut to help your blooms drink water. Don’t place the carnation bouquet in direct sunlight or under a vent, either air conditioning or heating.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Need your carnations to bloom faster? Use warm tap water to speed up the process (may impact the lifespan).

Icon TextLong Lifespan

Freesia

Freesia Care

These stunning flowers arrive in bud form, so you can expect the flowers to bloom over the next couple of weeks. Since they contain multiple flowers on each stem, some flowers may fade more quickly than others. Removing dead flowers will allow you to continue to enjoy those that are still looking fresh.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Trim at angle and fill vase with cold water (replace every 2 days).

Since freesia have 5-7 blooms per stem, remove dead blooms by hand to encourage more blooms!

For a fuller arrangement, we recommend ordering a deluxe or grand size (some freesia blooms can be small).

Icon TextPopular Gift

Gerbera Daisies

Daisy Care

Gerbera daisies are sometimes shipped with protective head nets. To remove, gently cut the bottom gently and pull the net downwards. Do not pull netting over the head of the daisies, as this can cause the flowers to pop off the stems.

Daisies are top-heavy flowers, so they benefit from shorter stems. We recommend trimming them 4 inches from the top of the vase to prevent drooping. For this reason, wide-mouth vases are not recommended.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Less toxic for dogs and cats

Hyacinth

Hyacinth Care

While hyacinths can be grown indoors from bulbs, they also look beautiful as cut flowers. However, due to their many blooms, these are top-heavy flowers. To provide adequate support, use a vase with a narrow neck.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets, especially dogs

Irises

Iris Care

Iris arrive in bud form for durability, but they will start blooming once you unpack them and place them in water. Pinch off any wilted flowers to keep the remaining flowers looking fresh.

Water: Change water every few days, Keep only the bottom few inches of stem in water

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Keep in cool temperature to delay blooming if needed.

Icon TextLong Lifespan

Lilies

Lily Care

While lilies bloom into spectacular trumpet-shaped flowers, they arrive in bud form. So if you’re hoping to display a bouquet of stunning lilies at a special event, it’s best to order so your flowers arrive a few days ahead of time. Our cut guarantees that 80-90% of blooms will open, but it's normal if a few don't.

We recommend removing the stamen that contains pollen to prevent staining and help with allergies. Simply put on a pair of gloves and then pinch the stamens at their bases.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Keep away from pets

Dangerous if ingested.

Adding warm water to vase can help speed up blooming.

If pollen stains occur, we recommend using a blow dryer, lint roller or scotch tape to remove via dry method.

Lisianthus

Lisianthus Care

While the delicate petals are a big reason why we love lisianthus, this fragility also means the flowers may appear a bit sad when they arrive. But don’t panic! Just give the stems a fresh cut and place them in water — once they’re hydrated they'll perk back up.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Potentially less toxic for dogs and cats

A trim and cold water will quickly help them bloom.

They tend to be thirsty flowers, so check the water level of your vase often.

Matthiola

Matthiola Care

Also known as stock, each Matthiola stem is covered in many fragrant flowers. The flowers near the base of the stems will bloom first, followed by flowers near the top of each stem. Since stock has woody stems, they sometimes have a difficult time taking in enough water. To encourage water uptake, give the stems a fresh trim each day.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets: Potentially less toxic for dogs and cats

Mixed Bouquet

Bouquet Care

Since mixed bouquets can contain any number of flowers, practice general bouquet care. Give the stems a fresh trim at a 45-degree angele. Remove any flowers that become wilted. Some types of flowers in a mixed bouquet have longer vase life than other flowers. You can remove wilting flowers and still enjoy the others that last longer. Not all flowers have the same vase life so in a mixed bouquet, expect some to wilt sooner than others.

Lilies, tulips, and peonies are among plants known to cause mild to severe reactions in pets if ingested. We strongly advise against sending these flowers to places with pets, but if you do, display in an area safely out of pet's reach.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Depends on the exact species in the bouquet

With Calla Lilies

Mixed Calla Bouquet Care

Since calla lilies are the most fragile in the bunch your care instructions will be tailored with these in mind. Calla Lilies absorb water quickly, so don't overfill the vase- 2 inches of water is all you need!

Trim the bottoms at an angle (helps to absorb water) and keep extra leaves above the water line. Some of the flowers in your arrangement may arrive in bud form which will quickly begin to bloom once hydrated.

Keep out of reach from pets.

With Daisies

Mixed Daisy Bouquet Care

The daisies in your arrangement are more delicate and need specific care. You may notice some arrive in protective nets which should be cut at the bottom and pulled (gently) downwards.

Trim edges at an angle and add to cold water while making sure the foliage is above water level. Daises are top-heavy flowers so be sure your vase does not have a wide mouth to prevent drooping.

With Hydrangeas

Mixed Hydrangea Bouquet Care

Hydrangeas have woody stems that need to draw water for maximum vase life. For best results keep the water level in their vase full and change every 2-3 days with cold water. Trim all flowers at an angle (for better water absorption) and keep foliage above the water line.

Tip if wilted: submerge them in cold water for 10 seconds (water can be absorbed from the petals). The most sensitive to acidity in water so be sure that it's changed every 2 days.

If a hydrangea blossom wilts prematurely, remove it, re-cut the stem at a sharp angle and place in warm water for at least one hour. The flower should be revived and ready to take its place in your arrangement.

With Lilies

Mixed Lily Bouquet Care

Lilies are delivered in mostly closed, bud form. Our cut guarantees that 80-90% of blooms will open, but it's normal if a few don't. Trim ends at an angle and to fit the vase for support. Change water every 3 days.

We recommend removing the stamen (pollen) with gloves to prevent staining. Display away from sunlight in cool area.

Dangerous if ingested. Keep away from all pets.

With Roses

Mixed Rose Bouquet Care

Trim edges at an angle and keep extra leaves above the waterline, especially since mixed arrangements tend to have filler stems with leaves. Remove outer (guard) petals from roses and change water every 2-3 days.

Icon TextLong Lifespan

Orchids

Orchid Care

While orchids are popular potted plants, they can also shine as cut flowers. This is especially true for spray orchids. With the proper care, these cut flowers can last up to three weeks! Make sure to use flower food and trim the stem each time you change the water. Spray orchids are different from regular, potted orchids in that they are delivered as stems which can be added to a full vase of water.

Remove any wilted blooms or foliage that falls below the waterline in vase. Enjoy for weeks and keep away from pets.

Ends can be trimmed every 4 days or as needed to ensure healthy water absorption.

Water:Provide fresh water every few days

Light:If the orchids are cut, keep out of direct light. Potted orchids prefer bright, indirect light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Peonies

Peony Care

While peonies are known for their dramatic ruffles, we want to make sure you enjoy every moment of these flowers! That’s why your peonies will arrive in bud form. To help encourage the blooming process, trim the ends of the stems and place them in freshwater.

It’s common for peonies to bloom at different speeds, so don’t be alarmed if some seem a bit behind. Once peony flowers are fully open, their average lifespan is about two to three days.

Peonies are among plants known to cause mild to severe reactions in pets if ingested. We strongly advise against sending these flowers to places with pets, but if you do, display in an area safely out of pet's reach.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Keep away from pets

If you'd like flowers with a longer lifespan that have a similar appearance, we recommend garden roses!

Ranunculus

Ranunculus Care

Ranunculus are delivered in bud form, and the buds may arrive green. As these buds bloom, they produce flowers that are three to five times their size!

Since ranunculus stems are quite delicate and have naturally curved stems, it’s best to use a tall vase to support the stems. A good rule of thumb is that the vase should be at least 2/3 the length of the cut stems.

Droopy ranunculus? Ensure the ends are trimmed at an angle and that the vase is filled with water. You’ll also want to make sure you’re using a vase that is tall enough to support the stems (or cut the stems down to fit your vase). A good rule of thumb is that the vase should be at least 2/3 the length of the cut stems.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Icon TextPopular Gift

Roses

Roses

Roses are delivered with their protective guard petals still attached. These petals may appear lighter in color or have spots — but don’t fear, that means they’ve done their job! Once the roses are safely in your home, use your hands to gently remove the guard petals.

While there are all kinds of roses (garden roses, spray roses, tea roses, etc.), all types can benefit from freshly-cut stems. You should also make sure to remove any leaves that will fall below the water line.

Water: Change water every few days

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Garden Roses

Garden Rose Care

Garden roses are larger and more fragile than regular roses. Remove outer protective petals (guard petals) and extra leaves as needed. Trim ends at a 45 degree angle and make sure foliage is above the water line.

Spray Roses

Spray Rose Care

Spray roses are petite and have thinner stems than regular roses which require their ends to be trimmed at a 45 degree angle for proper hydration.

Make sure that extra leaves are above the waterline and change water every 2-3 days for healthy blooms.

If your roses begin to wilt, you may be able to revive them. Trim off about an inch from the bottom of its stem and then submerge the entire rose under water in a sink or bathtub. Allow the stem to absorb water for about 20-60 minutes before returning them to their vase.

Tea Roses

Tea Rose Care

Tea roses arrive with guard petals still attached which may appear lighter in color or have spots (this is totally normal!). These protect roses while in transit and can be easily removed upon delivery.

Make sure to remove foliage that fall below the waterline when refreshing your arrangement. Re-cutting the stems at an angle often will give your roses the longest vase life.

Snapdragons

Snapdragon Care

Snapdragons may arrive in bud form or with partially opened flowers, but the flowers will open over the next few days. As with all flowers, remove any foliage that would sit below the water line.

Trim the ends at an angle to ensure proper water absorption. Change water every 2-3 days or as needed and make sure that leaves and foliage are above the water line.

Water:Check water every day since snapdragons drink lots of water

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Succulents

Succulent Care

Yes, that’s right, succulents can be a part of bouquets! When succulents arrive, their ‘stems’ are not actually part of the plant — they're just a way to make the succulent appear like a flower.

Succulents included in mixed arrangements can be replanted into a separate pot and sprayed with water in between watering.

Water:Remember to water after you’ve replanted the succulent in soil

Light: Keep out of direct light

Pets:Depends on the specific species

Sunflowers

Sunflowers are top-heavy flowers that are prone to drooping. To keep them upright, cut the stems to ensure they are supported by the vase. If the flowers arrive with protective nets, carefully cut the nets and pull them downwards off the flowers.

Water:Change water every few days

Light:Bright, indirect light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Droopy sunflowers? Make sure they are not too tall for their vase or too cramped which prevents proper water absorption. Cut to fit vase (they need support to stand straight) and watch them bloom!

Tulips

Tulip Care

Tulips are shipped in bud form and may arrive slightly curved - this is completely normal! Trim the stem at a 45 degree angle and cut to about 4 inches from the top of the vase for support. Only add about 2 inches of water at a time to avoid over hydrating then add more daily to maintain same water level (tulips drink water quickly!)

Change water every 2-3 days or as needed. Since tulips are cut and shipped from the farm, a little dirt may be present at delivery. A quick trim and rinse easily removes any dirt.

Tulips are known to cause mild to severe reactions in pets if ingested. We strongly advise against having these flowers in places with pets, but if you do, display in an area safely out of pet's reach.

Water:Tulips are thirsty flowers — check and replenish the water every day. Only the bottom two inches of the stems should be in water.

Light:Keep out of direct light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Droopy tulips? Make sure your tulips are trimmed to the size of your vase (we recommend about 4 inches above the rim) so they are well supported. Tulips are soft-stemmed and will droop if there is more than 2 inches of water in the vase.

Remove extra leaves if your flowers seem crammed or if it's preventing all flowers from receiving proper hydration.

Tropical Flowers

Tropical Flower Care

Tropical flowers include stunning specimens like ginger flowers, musa (banana), and lobster claws. Be sure to keep these arrangements away from cold drafts and provide some extra humidity if possible. Tropical flowers do NOT need flower food.

Water:Provides lots of water and change every few days

Light:Keep out of direct light

Pets:Depends on the species

Tropical flowers need a LOT of water. Fill the vase at least 2/3 full and change every 2-3 days.

Mini fruits included are not edible. Keep away from pets.

Tropical arrangements can absorb water from their leaves and flowers. Tropical flowers also absorb water from their environment. Spray them once a day to ensure long and happy vase life.

If your Bouq looks a but squeezed after transportation, carefully separate the blooms with your hands. Flowers and foliage will return back to their original shape.

Desert Hoya (Hoya Hearts)

Desert Hoya Plant Care

Although these plants naturally grow as a vining succulent, people often cut and grow their heart-shaped leaves. Since these plants are succulents, it’s essential to use a well-draining potting soil and water only when dry!

Water:Water every few weeks when the soil is dry

Light:Bright, direct light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Best Fern (Bird's Nest Fern)

Bird’s Nest Fern Plant Care

In the wild, these ferns often grow on other plants, rather than in soil. Therefore, it’s essential that you use a chunky and well-draining potting mix. Aim to keep the humidity medium to high and the temperature above 60ºF.

Water:Water every few weeks when the soil is dry

Light:Bright, indirect light

Pets:Not toxic to pets

Desert Fairytale (Fairytale Cactus)

Like most cacti, the fairytale cactus likes it sunny and dry. Use a potting mix designed for cacti for best results.

Water:Water every two to three weeks

Light:Bright, indirect light

Pets:Mildly toxic to pets

Dynamic Duo (Zebra and Echevaria Blue Prince)

This pair of succulents is happiest in a well-draining mix and plenty of bright light. When it comes to watering, err on the dryer side.

Water:Water every two to three weeks when the soil is dry

Light:Bright and direct light

Pets:Both plants are safe for pets

Farmer’s Choice Orchid

As with most orchids, these flowering plants do best when planted in a mix that’s designed specifically for orchids. This chunky mix mimics the orchid’s natural environment and allows excess water to escape.

Water:Thoroughly wet the growing media every week then allow to drain

Light:Bright yet indirect light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Flamingle (Anthurium - Flamingo)

As a tropical plant, the anthurium loves humidity, but moderate humidity will suffice. If your house is extremely dry, consider buying a humidifier to help. Keep the temperature above 65ºF and use a well-draining soil mix.

Water:Water when the top half of soil is dry, about every one to two weeks

Light:Bright yet indirect light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Inner Peace (Peace Lily)

Peace lilies thrive in consistently moist soil as well as high humidity. Use a potting mix that holds moisture but also allows excess water to escape. These plants can be a bit sensitive to minerals found in tap water, so it’s best to use rainwater or distilled water.

Water:Aim to keep the soil moist but not wet; water every one to two weeks

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Lady Luck (Yellow Orchid)

This flowering plant will perform best when it’s planted in a mix that’s designed specifically for orchids. This chunky mix mimics the orchid’s natural environment and allows excess water to escape.

Water:Thoroughly soak once a week and then allow to drain

Light:Bright yet indirect light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Make It ZZ (Zamioculcas Zamiifolia)

Although the ZZ plant has a reputation of being almost industructive, you’ll still need to provide this plant with some care. Use a well-draining potting mix and don’t allow the air temperature to dip below 60ºF.

Water:Water when the top half of soil is dry, about once every two weeks

Light:They prefer bright to medium, indirect light but can survive low light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Margarita (Dracena Marginata plant)

Also known as the dragon tree, this plant can tolerate a bit of neglect. With that said, don’t let the soil moisture level fluctuate too much and keep the air temperature warm.

Water:Water once every one to two weeks

Light:Bright, indirect light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Mint to Be (Ficus Tineke)

Like many types of rubber trees, this plant likes moderate to high humidity. It isn’t drought tolerant but also doesn’t like saturated potting mix, so aim to allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings.

Water:Water every one to two weeks

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Moderately toxic to pets

Monstera Magic (Philodendron Monstera)

Also known as the Swiss cheese plant, this big monstera knows how to make a statement. To help these plants thrive, keep the humidity moderate to high and use a well-draining soil mix.

Water:Water once every one to two weeks

Light:Bright yet indirect light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Oasis (Snake Plant)

One of the easiest to care for houseplants, snake plants can tolerate a wide variety of light conditions as well as periods of drought. With that said, use a well-draining potting mix and err on the side of underwatering.

Water:Allow the top half of the soil to dry in between watering

Light:Prefers bright to medium indirect light but can tolerate low light

Pets:Keep away from pets

One Fine Ficus (Fica Elastica Burgundy)

To keep these plants happy, keep the temperature above 65ºF and use a soil mix that allows excess water to drain.

Water:Allow soil to dry between waterings; water about every two weeks

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Moderately toxic to pets

Sandi (Philodendron Birkin)

Like many houseplants, the birkin likes a well-draining soil mix. To keep the plant happy, allow the soil to dry out in between waterings.

Water:Water every one to two weeks

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Keep away from pets

Show Me the Money Tree (Money Tree)

To keep these plants thriving, plant them in a well-draining soil mix and allow the top half of the soil to dry before watering.

Water:Water deeply about every two weeks

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Potentially less toxic for pets

Super Teak (Calathea Medallion)

As a type of prayer plant, the calathea medallion thrives in high humidity. If you have a dry home, you may need to boost the air moisture with a humidifier. These plants can also be sensitive to minerals in tap water, so use rainwater or filtered water.

Water:Keep soil moist but not saturated; water about once a week

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Not toxic for pets

Tall Tail (Ponytail Palm)

Although this plant has palm in its name, it’s actually a type of succulent! That means it can handle a fair bit of drought but not wet soil!

Water:Water about once every two weeks

Light:Bright indirect light

Pets:Not toxic for pets

Thea (Calathea Rattlesnake)

Like other types of calathea, this plant thrives in high humidity. If you have a dry home, you may need to boost the air moisture with a humidifier. These plants can also be sensitive to minerals in tap water, so use rainwater or filtered water.

Water:Water about once a week to keep the soil moist

Light:Medium to bright indirect light

Pets:Not toxic for pets

Three Wishes (Orchids)

Water:Once a week

Light:Medium to low indirect light

Pets:Not toxic for pets

Tropicali (Purple Orchid)

Water:Once a week

Light:Indirect

Pets:Not toxic for pets

^
Top of Page