Flower Facts Flower Information Spring

Best Early-Blooming Spring Flowers

close up white and yellow flowers

After a dark winter, you’re probably itching for a bit of little bit of color. That’s where spring flowers come in! Whether you want to plant some flowers in your garden or order flowers for spring, there are lots of lovely spring blooms you can enjoy.

We’ve going to cover popular annuals, perennials, bulbs, and shrubs that flower in spring. We’ll also provide some flowers you can plant in spring so your garden can keep blooming all year long!

Flowers to Plant in Spring

human hand planting young sunflowers plant on dirt soil use for people activities in gardening and nature topic

Even if your garden is already filled with colorful flowers, you’ll need to plan ahead if you want plants to keep blooming into the summer. By planting these flowers once temperatures begin to warm, you’ll have a supply of color well into the fall.

Some plants can be planted from seed while others work best as transplants, so make sure to read up on each flower before you add it to your garden.

  • Sunflower
  • Gladiolus
  • Marigold
  • Sweet alyssum
  • Columbine
  • Black-eyed Susan
  • Dianthus
  • Lavender
  • Zinnia

Spring-Flowering Annuals

A greenhouse full of flowers.

Although you’ll need to replant annuals each spring, spending time in the garden will help remind you warmer weather is on its way.

Viola

Violas look like versions of pansies, with many colorful blooms on each plant. While violas don’t handle hot temperatures very well, they shine in cool spring weather. They can even survive light frosts!

USDA Grow Zone: 3–8
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Soil: Rich and well-draining with a slightly acidic pH
Why We Love This Flower: Violas are edible flowers with a subtle floral taste – try adding the flowers to salads or using them to decorate cakes!

Lobelia

While lobelia is actually a perennial, its tender nature means many people treat it as an annual. The plants are low-growing with a bit of a trailing form, making them a good choice for window boxes, rock gardens, edging plants, and more!

USDA Grow Zone: 3–11
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Deer and other critters tend to leave these plants alone.

Petunia

As fast-growing plants with a seemingly never-ending supply of blooms, petunias are a beloved garden flower. While they’re treated as annuals in most places, they can be grown as tender perennials in zones 10 and 11.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–11
Sun: Full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Petunias start blooming in spring but continue flowering throughout the summer!

Snapdragon

With tall spikes of colorful blooms, snapdragons are a delightful addition to spring gardens and planter boxes. They thrive in the cool weather found during the spring and fall.

USDA Grow Zone: 2–11
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Snapdragons add height to mixed bouquets and can last for about a week.

Ranunculus

While you can grow ranunculus yourself, you’ll need to start the plants from corms. However, flower farmers often grow these flowers, so look for them in bouquets.

USDA Grow Zone: 8–11
Sun: Full sun
Soil: Rich and well-drained
Why We Love This Flower: Ranunculus has exquisite layers of delicate petals, making them a show-stopping flower.

Sweet Alyssum

These plants produce many clusters of tiny flowers with a sweet fragrance. Since they have so many blooms, they look great tucked into rock gardens, window boxes, and garden beds.

USDA Grow Zone: 2–11
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Sweet alyssum flowers attract many beneficial insects, including parasitic wasps and native bees.

Stock

With a sweet yet slightly spicy scent, long vase life, and beautiful flowers, stock is a must-have spring flower. The blooms come in a wide range of colors, including pink, white, purple, and yellow. While the majority of people grow stock as an annual, if you live in zones 7–10 you can grow it as a tender perennial.

USDA Grow Zone: 4–10
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Rich and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Although you may not know it, stock flowers are closely related to brassicas like broccoli and cabbage!

Spring-Flowering Perennials

Virginia bluebells on an overcast day. The bluebells have rounded and gray-green leaves, borne on stems up to 24 in. Flowers have five petals fused into a tube, five stamens, and a central pistil.

If you’re looking for plants that produce a colorful display year after year, consider planting some of the spring-blooming perennials.

Hellebore

The hellebore is one of the first flowers to make an appearance in the spring, often blooming as snow still blankets the ground. Due to its early spring timing and delicate petals, it’s also known as the lenten rose.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–9
Sun: Partial shade to shade
Soil: Well-draining yet moist
Why We Love This Flower: Not only are hellebore flowers beautiful in the garden, but they also have attractive leaves that provide interest year-round.

Primrose

Primroses are a huge group of plants with over 500 species in the family. Their flowers range from purple to yellow to pink, so you’re likely to find an option that suits your tastes. Although some varieties may bloom during the summer, the vast majority produce flowers in the spring.

USDA Grow Zone: 2–8
Sun: Partial shade or shade
Soil: Well-draining, rich, and moist
Why We Love This Flower: Primroses need very little care, making them an easy way to add a pop of color to shady areas.

Adonis

A member of the buttercup family, adonis flowers are one of the first flowers to bloom each spring. They’re also known as pheasant’s eye and false hellebore.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–7
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Along with beautiful flowers, these plants also produce lacy foliage.

Lily of the Valley

Don’t let the name deceive you, these plants are actually more closely related to asparagus. Regardless, these short plants produce elegant white flowers. The plants tend to spread, so they’re a great choice if you’re looking for a flowering ground cover.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–8
Sun: Partial shade to full sun
Soil: Rich and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: While lily of the valley flowers may be small, they produce an intoxicating fragrance that’s reminiscent of floral perfumes.

Virginia Bluebells

Often found beside rivers and streams, Virginia bluebells brighten shady, moist gardens with their periwinkle blooms. Although the majority of open blooms are blue, the flower buds are often pale pink.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–8
Sun: Partial shade to shade
Soil: Rich and moist
Why We Love This Flower: Humans aren’t the only ones who love these flowers – bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds visit to drink the flower’s nectar.

Trillium

Trillium plants are native to much of the United States, where they grow in rich, moist woods. The leaves and flowers bloom each spring then die back as warmer temperatures arrive, which means these plants are spring ephemerals.

USDA Grow Zone: 4–9
Sun: Part shade to full shade
Soil: Rich, moist, and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: As its name suggests, the trillium has leaves and petals in groups of three.

Spring-Flowering Bulbs

Tulips, daffodils and pansies in the flower bed in the garden. Well-kept English style garden. A Sunny spring day. Selective focus. Background of spring flowers.

Although you need to plant the majority of these bulbs in the fall, they will begin blooming in the spring. Some bloom for only one year while others flower over multiple years.

Tulip

Whether you enjoy tulips in your garden or in a bouquet, it’s hard to imagine spring without them. Since these flowers grow from bulbs, you’ll need to plan ahead. However, the foresight is worth it. And if you’re looking for an amazing tulip display, visit spring flower fields near you!

USDA Grow Zone: 3–8
Sun: Full sun
Soil: Rich and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Tulips come in all sorts of colors and varieties – check out fringed tulips and parrot tulips if you’re looking to mix things up.

Daffodil

Plant daffodil bulbs in the fall and you’ll be rewarded by cheerful yellow flowers the following spring. While the bright blooms work well in bouquets, they also produce a toxin that will cause some other types of flowers to wilt.

USDA Grow Zone: 4–8
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Rich and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Critters like moles and deer typically leave daffodil bulbs alone, so they’re a great choice if you’re sharing your yard with wildlife.

Crocus

Crocuses are one of the first bulb flowers to bloom each spring, often sneaking out from ground covered with snow or frost. Crocuses are grown from corms, not bulbs, but they act similar to many other bulb flowers.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–8
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Since crocuses are short flowers – maxing out at six inches – they work well in front of other plants.

Hyacinth

Not only are hyacinths gorgeous, but they also produce one of the most unmistakable floral scents. Their blue, pink, and white flowers fit in nicely with holidays to celebrate in spring.

USDA Grow Zone: 4–8
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: You can plant hyacinth bulbs almost anywhere, including in the garden, in a container, and in a water-filled vase.

Snowdrop

As their name suggests, snowdrops bloom in early spring when snow may still be around. While their white flowers are beautiful, be aware they’re toxic to humans and pets.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–7
Sun: Partial shade to full sun
Soil: Loose and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: The bulbs naturally multiply, so you can dig them up and move them to other areas…or share them with friends.

Spring-Flowering Shrubs

Active flowering of lilac rhododendron and yellow forsytsia in early spring. High quality photo

These shrubs become filled with flowers in the spring, providing a beautiful dose of color.

Forsythia

With bright yellow flowers and a low-maintenance growth habit, forsythia is one of the most popular flowering shrubs. They flower before they produce leaves, which is a bit unusual.

USDA Grow Zone: 5–8
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Forsythia can last about a week as a cut flower.

Lilac

Lilacs produce clusters of flowers that draw in both humans and butterflies. Make sure to plant them in full sun if you want lots of flowers!

USDA Grow Zone: 3–7
Sun: Full sun
Soil: Well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Whether you enjoy these flowers in the garden or as part of a bouquet, you’ll fall in love with their sweet fragrance.

Japanese Pieris

Also known as the lily of the valley shrub, this plant produces many clusters of small, bell-shaped flowers. Unlike true lilies of the valley, these flowers don’t have a strong fragrance.

USDA Grow Zone: 5–8
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist, well-draining, and acidic
Why We Love This Flower: Along with delicate flowers, Japanese Pieris also produces evergreen foliage, which often emerges in shades of red.

Witch Hazel

While you may have heard of witch hazel in skincare products, this plant also produces yellow flowers. Sometimes witch hazel blooms in the late fall or winter, but it may also bloom in the early spring.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–9
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Moist and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Both the species and weather impact when witch hazel flowers, so it’s always a bit of a surprise.

Azalea

Whether you have on azalea planted in your garden or enjoy seeing hundreds of native azaleas in the wild, it’s hard to imagine spring without these gorgeous shrubs. Thanks to breedings efforts, more than 10,000 cultivars now exist!

USDA Grow Zone: 3–9
Sun: Part shade to full sun
Soil: Acidic and well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Azaleas come in a wide variety of sizes and colors, so you can find one you love.

Bleeding Heart

The bleeding heart is a vegetative plant that grows to resemble a small shrub. It produces dazzling heart-shaped flowers each spring.

USDA Grow Zone: 2–9
Sun: Part shade to full shade
Soil: Moist and high in organic matter
Why We Love This Flower: The plants are easy to care for and thrive in shady conditions.

Peony

Not only do peonies brighten up your garden, but they look beautiful in arrangements. Try cutting the flowers when they’re just starting to bloom so you can watch the petals emerge over time.

USDA Grow Zone: 3–9
Sun: Partial shade to full sun
Soil: Well-draining
Why We Love This Flower: Although peonies start blooming in the spring, their blooms last into the summer.

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