Rosh Hashanah Flowers

Send sustainably-grown bouquets directly from farms all over the world for Rosh Hashana! We cut when you order ensuring you get the freshest flowers possible, so they last!

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Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year

Rosh Hashanah literally means “the head of the year.” As the traditional Jewish holiday to usher in the New Year, it’s a time of celebration and remembrance. It kicks off several High Holy Days with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement following about a week later. Traditionally, the holiday is a time for repentance and asking for forgiveness of sins. Rosh Hashanah meals usually include challah bread to represent continuity and apple slices with honey to symbolize hope for a sweet new year.


Rosh Hashanah Gifts and Flowers

If you’re lucky enough to be invited into a family’s home to celebrate Rosh Hashanah, it’s customary to bring Rosh Hashanah gifts. You can’t go wrong bringing or sending some flowers. There are a few different ways to approach flowers for Rosh Hashanah. White flowers can be appropriate since they symbolize purity and innocence. Popular white flowers for a Rosh Hashanah bouquet can include lilies, orchids, and roses.


Seasonal Flowers for Rosh Hashanah

Because Rosh Hashanah takes place during autumn, flowers that represent the fall season can also be appropriate. Think yellows, oranges, and burgundy bouquets. Sunflowers, calla lilies, roses, and pincushions make great choices. You can even think outside the box and select a dried flower bouquet that reflects the season and will last as long as you want.


Bright Flowers for a Bright New Year

Rosh Hashanah is a celebration. So celebratory bright and vibrant flowers can also be well suited. The most important thing when choosing a Rosh Hashanah bouquet is knowing the family you are bringing the flowers to. If the family just experienced a loss, bright bouquet might not be appropriate but if they were just blessed with a birth, maybe bright bouquets are the best flowers for that Rosh Hashanah.


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